The Best 21 Campgrounds Near the Grand Canyon

When it comes to the ultimate travel bucket list destinations, nothing’s quite as classic as the Grand Canyon. I mean, it even has a cameo in National Lampoon’s Vacation.

But when you’re trying to figure out your Grand Canyon vacation, one of the most challenging aspects is figuring out where to park your vehicle. There are so many camping options near the Grand Canyon — how can you figure out which one is right for you and your family?

Fortunately, the plethora of Grand Canyon campgrounds means there’s likely to be something absolutely perfect for your needs, no matter how you prefer to enjoy your vacation. From luxury, resort-style accommodations with full hookups and swimming pools to dispersed camping on public lands, there’s a campsite in the Grand Canyon area that will suit your needs! We’ve even got some FREE Grand Canyon camping in the imx.

In this post, we’ll walk you through some of the best camping options at the Grand Canyon, from the South Rim to the North Rim and even campgrounds further afield, away from the main Grand Canyon National Park entrance.

Ready to learn all you need to know to make your Grand Canyon camping excursion an unforgettable one? Read on!

South Rim and Flagstaff

The southern rim of the Grand Canyon may be the most famous portion — it’s where many of those sweeping photographs of the National Park you’re familiar with are shot. Here are the best places to camp near the South Rim of the Canyon, including campgrounds inside the park itself.

Click here to see RVshare rentals near the South Rim and Flagstaff.

1. Mather Campground (NPS)

If camping inside Grand Canyon National Park is your goal, you’re in luck. Mather Campground is the NPS-owned campground along the South Rim that’s open year-round. While there are no hookups available, it’s pet-friendly and offers accessible restrooms, all at an affordable price point.

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Pet friendly; accessible restrooms
  • Price: $18 per night

2. Trailer Village

Image via visitgrandcanyon.com

Directly adjacent to Mather Campground, you’ll find Trailer Village, a developed RV campground offering full hookups and other amenities. Although the campground is on NPS property, it’s owned and managed by a third party, meaning the fees are higher — but for a comfortable stay in the closest possible proximity to the Canyon, Trailer Village can’t be beat.

  • Hookups: Yes; full
  • Other Amenities: Paved, pull-thru sites; big-rig friendly; open year round; pet friendly
  • Price: $44-$64 (changes seasonally)

3. Desert View (NPS)

Image via nps.org

Further east, in a less-developed area, the NPS has another on-site campground called Desert View. Although this campground doesn’t offer RV hookups, its serene, solitude-nurturing location means it fills up most days by 12 p.m. Unlike Mather Campground or Trailer Village, Desert View is only open seasonally, closing for the winter. It’s also first-come, first-served only, so you can’t make reservations.

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Water faucets; accessible restrooms; campfire grills
  • Price: $12

4. Ten-X Campground

Image via fs.usda.gov

Nestled in the nearby Kaibab National Forest, Ten-X Campground is a public camping option that’s very near to the national park, if not inside it. It’s tucked into a ponderosa pine and Gambel oak forest on the Tusayan Ranger District, meaning you get the best of both worlds: a quiet retreat that’s only a four mile drive from the park entrance. While there are no hookups available, the campground does offer spacious pull-thru sites that can accommodate vehicles of up to 35 feet in length. It’s wicked cheap to boot!

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Pull-thru sites; restrooms; on-site nature trail
  • Price: $10

5. Grand Canyon Camper Village

Image via grandcanyoncampervillage.com

A privately-owned, resort-style campground just a few miles south of the national park, Grand Canyon Camper Village is spacious, clean, and luxurious — and for added convenience, the NPS shuttle runs directly from the village of Tusayan, where it’s situated. Full hookup sites with up to 50 amps of service are available, as well as token-operated showers, coin laundry facilities, propane sales, and a small camp store.

  • Hookups: Yes; full
  • Other Amenities: Coin laundry and shower facilities; camp store with propane sales; on-site access to hiking and biking trails
  • Price: $52-$66 depending on amenities

6. Grand Canyon/Williams KOA

Image via koa.com

KOA is an old standby in the camping community, with reliable resources you can count on in any franchised campground across the country. The Grand Canyon/Williams KOA location is no exception, and just a few miles west of Flagstaff, it’s a perfect location from which to explore the area.

  • Hookups: Yes; full
  • Other Amenities: Big-rig friendly; pool; propane; dog park; wifi; snack bar, and more
  • Price: Varies

7. Williams/Exit 167/Circle Pines KOA

Image via TripAdvisor

Yet another convenient and reliable location in the south Grand Canyon area, this KOA isn’t quite as close to the park gates as the Grand Canyon/Williams location, but it has all the amenities you could ask for and is convenient to I-40, making it an easy decision after a long day’s drive. The Williams/Exit 167/Circle Pines KOA boasts full hookups with up to 50 amps of service, an on-site cafe serving up breakfast and dinner seasonally, free wifi, an indoor pool, hot tubs and so much more.

  • Hookups: Yes; full
  • Other Amenities: Big-rig friendly; pool; hot tubs; bike rentals; on-site cafe and more
  • Price: Varies

8. Long Jim Loop

Image via freecampsites.net

FREE camping near the most sought-after RVing destination on Earth? It might sound too good to be true, but it’s actually possible at the Long Jim Loop campground just south of the Canyon. This gravel fire road offers free camping for up to 14 days and it’s accessible even to larger motorhomes and trailers. While there are no hookups, you can find resources like free wifi at nearby accommodations and restaurants, and coin laundry and showers are available just inside the park at the on-campus campground.

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Big-rig friendly; close proximity to amenities and the park
  • Price: FREE!

9. Bonito Campground

Image via fs.usda.gov

Named for the Bonito Lava Flow which oozed across this high desert plain some 900 years ago, Bonito Campground is located just a few miles northeast of Flagstaff, making it a great location from which to visit the Grand Canyon and other area attractions. While there are no utility hookups, rigs up to 42 feet in length are welcome, as are well-behaved, leashed pets.

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Big-rig friendly; picnic tables, grills and fire pits; pet friendly; flush toilets; water
  • Price: $25

10. Flagstaff KOA

Image via koa.com

If you’re looking for an amenity-filled KOA a little bit closer to town than to the park gates, check out the Flagstaff KOA. This location offers free wifi, big-rig friendly sites, laundry facilities, bathroom and shower facilities and more — and it’s a great spot to explore both the city and the countryside.

  • Hookups: Yes; full
  • Other Amenities: Big-rig friendly; up to 50 amps of service; bathrooms and showers; laundry; free wifi
  • Price: Varies

11. Forest Road 688

Image via freecampsites.net

South of the Grand Canyon, this campsite is on National Forest land and is free for dispersed campers — who may even be lucky enough to spot some elk or deer. While there are no developed amenities or utilities at the Forest Road 688 campsite, it’s totally free and has room for up to approximately 20 campers.

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Proximity to park; no developed amenities
  • Price: FREE!

12. Old State Route 64

Another great free option for campers willing to get a little bit remote and “rough it,” the campsite along Old State Route 64 offers free RV parking for up to 14 nights. Just be sure you pack in all the water and food that you need — and pack out all your trash!

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Proximity to park; no developed amenities
  • Price: FREE!

13. Forest Road 302

The free campsite off Forest Road 302 is a popular one — and for good reason. Not only is it accessible to big rigs and fifth wheels, it’s also close enough for campers to walk to town for a quick drink or a run to the convenience store. And, of course, it’s totally free of charge. Campers even report decent cell data coverage!

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Proximity to park; campfire rings
  • Price: FREE!

14. Forest Road 306

Who knew there was so much free camping near the Grand Canyon, huh? There’s one more great option available in Kaibab National Forest off Forest Road 306, and campers report it’s clean, quiet, easy to access — and for some reason, relatively empty. Get there before the secret gets out!

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Proximity to park; campfire rings
  • Price: FREE!

North Rim

Some believe that you don’t really get a full understanding of the Grand Canyon unless you visit the North Rim, whose remote location means less foot traffic and a more untouched view of the canyon. However, bear in mind that some of the roads to this portion of the canyon can be inaccessible in the winter and are therefore only open seasonally.

Here are some of the best campgrounds to consider on the north rim of the Grand Canyon.

Click here to see RVshare rentals near the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. 

15. North Rim Campground (NPS)

The on-site North Rim campground, managed and run by the NPS, doesn’t offer utility hookups… but it does have a dump station, accessible restrooms, and some of the most powerful views in the entire southwest. Water refilling stations are also available, and leashed pets are welcome.

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Dump station; accessible restrooms; reservations available
  • Price: $18-$25

16. DeMotte Campground

Image via recreation.gov

Another public option in the Kaibab National Forest, DeMotte Campground offers dry campsites (that is, without hookups) for those traveling in small motorhomes and travel trailers. Due to its remote location, it’s only open seasonally — and access is not advisable to those traveling in larger RVs.

  • Hookups:  No
  • Other Amenities: Pet friendly; available for up to 14 days’ max stay; drinking water available
  • Price: $20

17. Jacob Lake Recreation Area

fs.usda.gov

The town of Jacob Lake is considered the gateway to the northern rim of the Canyon, and this campground is conveniently located close to both the natural wonder and the town itself. Sites are reservable on a six-month rolling basis, though the campground is only open seasonally thanks to the harsh winters in this part of the world. Water is available, but because it’s a limited resource, filling RV tanks is not allowed.

  • Hookups:  No
  • Other Amenities: Vault toilets; campfire rings; picnic tables; grills; access to nearby restaurants, stores, and other amenities
  • Price: $20

18. Kaibab Camper Village

Image via kaibabcampervillage.com

The only north rim RV campground with full hookups available, if you want to explore this remote area in comfort and style, Kaibab Camper Village is an excellent pick. Their spacious sites can accommodate RVs over 40 feet in length, and the on-site Kaibab Lodge hosts a restaurant, lounge, and gift shop.

  • Hookups:  Yes, full
  • Other Amenities: On-site lodge with restaurant, lounge, and gift shop; spacious pull-thru sites
  • Price: $40-$45

19. East Viewpoint

Image via freecampsites.net

Tucked inside Kaibab National Forest just outside of the Saddle Mountain Wilderness Area, East Viewpoint is a small — but free! — dispersed camping site on the north side of the Canyon. While there are only 1-5 campsites available in this remote location, you are free to park for as long as you wish, and there are no limitations on vehicle size in place.

  • Hookups: No
  • Other Amenities: Proximity and solitude are the two selling points of this campground, which doesn’t offer any amenities
  • Price: FREE!

Other Grand Canyon Campgrounds

Although the area near the national park may get a lot of play (and for good reason), there are actually plenty of other places to go camping at the Grand Canyon. For instance, the canyon runs through Page, Arizona, home to the fantastically photographable Horseshoe Bend as well as Antelope Canyon.

Here are some of the best campgrounds near the Grand Canyon — outside of the main spots near the national park.

Click here to see RVshare rentals near Page, Arizona.

20. Page Lake Powell Campground

Image via TripAdvisor

This part of the world is often known as the “Grand Circle” — because as grand as the Grand Canyon is, there’s so much more to see and do here. From enjoying watersports on Lake Powell to staring in wonder as you wander through Antelope Canyon, Page Lake Powell Campground is a great place to call home base while you’re exploring.

  • Hookups:  Yes, full
  • Other Amenities: Free wifi; generous spaces with up to 50 amps of service; propane gas sales; dump station; playground; fitness room; indoor pool; convenience store; complimentary tea and coffee, and more
  • Price: $39.96-$47.95

21. Wahweap Marina and Campground

Image via lakepowell.com

Just a quarter mile from the shore of Lake Powell, Wahweap Marina and Campground hosts a restaurant, lounge, and gift shop right on-site — and the red rock views are so lovely, you may be tempted never to leave the campground itself.

  • Hookups:  Yes, full
  • Other Amenities: Some sites available for rigs up to 70 feet; coin-operated laundry and shower facilities; walking distance to Wahweap Swim Beach; free wifi
  • Price: Varies

Grand Canyon Camping: Frequently Asked Questions

Now that we’ve covered some of the best places to camp at the Grand Canyon, let’s finish out this blog post by answering some of the most frequently-asked questions about Grand Canyon camping.

What does it cost to camp at the Grand Canyon?

As you can tell from the list above, the price to camp at the Grand Canyon varies significantly depending on what kind of campground you’re staying in, where it’s located, and what amenities it offers. You can find affordable public campsites in the Grand Canyon area, or you cal spend a pretty penny on a luxurious, resort-style campground. It’s all up to your individual desires and preferences.

Can you camp inside Grand Canyon National Park?

Yes, there are campgrounds inside Grand Canyon National Park, including Mather Campground, Trailer Village, and Desert View. For specific information on any of these campgrounds, please see the list above.

Which part of the Grand Canyon is best?

This is a toughy! Although the entire Grand Canyon is beautiful, some spots offer more solitude while others are more developed and filled with engaging interpretive signage and exhibits. It’s all about what kind of experience you’re after, specifically.

For detailed information on some of the best trails, shops, and restaurants in and around the Grand Canyon, check out our official National Park guide.

What’s the best time to visit the Grand Canyon?

The Grand Canyon is lovely year round, but the most popular times to visit tend to be spring and early fall, when the temperature isn’t at its extremes. Over the summer, the Grand Canyon can reach stifling, three-digit temperatures, and over the winter it often gets cold enough to snow — both of which can be off-putting to those attempting long or intricate hikes in the area. That said, these peak travel seasons are also very busy, so if you’re looking for stranger-free Instagram photos, you may decide it’s worth dealing with some not-so-perfect weather.

Enjoy your trip!

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